Baltic Sea Basin


Description of the Baltic Sea Catchment Area

The Baltic Sea catchment area comprises 1 720 270 km2, of which nearly 93% belongs to the nine riparian countries; Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Russia and Sweden.

Sweden has the largest Baltic Sea catchment area with 440 000 km2, followed by Poland, Russia and Finland, all of which have areas larger than 300 000 km2. Six of the nations - Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and Sweden – are situated almost entirely within the catchment, while less than half of the land area in Denmark and only one-eighteenth in Germany is situated within the catchment.

Only a very small fraction of the total area of the Russian Federation, including St. Petersburg, Leningrad oblast, and Kaliningrad, is found within the catchment (1.7%). The remaining 7% belongs to the five upstream states, which have a relatively insignificant influence on the Baltic Sea. The detailed division of the Baltic Sea catchment area is presented in table.

Source: Global International Waters Assessment Baltic Sea, GIWA Regional assessment 17, 2005. Available at:  http://www.unep.org/dewa/giwa/areas/reports/r17/giwa_regional_assessment_17.pdf


The total Baltic Sea catchment area comprises 1 720 270 km².

 
Sweden 440 040 25,6 %
Russia 314 800 18,3 %
Poland 311 900 18,1 %
Finland 301 300 17,5 %
Belarus 83 850 4,9 %
Lithuania 65 300 3,8 %
Latvia 64 600 3,8 %
Estonia 45 100 2,6 %
Denmark 31 110 1,8 %
Germany 28 600 1,7 %
Norway 13 360 0,8 %
Ukraine 11 170 0,6 %
Czech 7 190 0,4 %
Slovakia 1 950 0,1 %
Total 1 720 270 100,0 %

 












Did you know that?

  • 3% of the Baltic Sea water is replaced each year.
  • The Baltic Sea is 50 meters deep on average
  • 90 million people are living around the Baltic Sea basin
  • The Baltic Sea is affected by water flowing from 10 countries
  • With ecological recycling agriculture nitrogen losses can be reduced by half and phosphorus losses sharply reduced
  • An average swede uses 4000 m2 of arable land for their food
  • With a balanced diet with no more than 20% meat, 2000 m2 of production per person is enough - half of what is required today
  • 2000 m2/person corresponds to the average of Earth’s total cultivated area, divided equally among all people

 

 

Did you know?

An average Swede uses 4000 m2 of arable land for their food production.

Half of that area, 2000 m2 per person, would be enough if we reduce the amount of meat to about 20% of the food consumed.

2000 m2 per person corresponds to the average of Earth’s total cultivated area, divided equally among all people.